Postdoctoral Fellows

Tarek Amer

Postdoctoral fellow

Tarek Amer Curriculum Vitae

Tarek is a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University and Harvard University working with Drs. Lila Davachi and Daniel Schacter. The aim of his research is to elucidate the cognitive control mechanisms that impact episodic memory, specifically, one’s ability to distinguish between overlapping, similar events, and remember the order of everyday life events.

Tarek graduated from the University of Toronto working under the supervision of Dr. Lynn Hasher and Dr. Cheryl Grady. As a graduate student, his work largely focused on the relationship between cognitive control and behavior across the lifespan, and particularly, how the level of cognitive control engagement mediates performance across a variety of tasks.

Email me: tarek_amer@fas.harvard.edu

Adam Bulley

postdoctoral fellow

Adam Bulley Google Scholar

Adam is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. In his research, he uses the tools of evolutionary and cognitive psychology to study the mind and human behavior. Specifically, he investigates the evolution, development, and psychological mechanisms of imagination, foresight, decision-making, and emotion. He is currently based at the Schacter Memory Lab as an NHMRC CJ Martin Early Career Fellow. He is also affiliated with the Memory and Imagination in Neurological Disorders (MIND) group led by Professor Muireann Irish at the Brain and Mind Centre, the University of Sydney, as well as the University of Sydney School of Psychology. He was previously based at the University of Queensland School of Psychology, at the Early Cognitive Development Centre and the Centre for Psychology and Evolution. In his research, he has done experimental, cross-sectional, and longitudinal studies with diverse samples including undergraduate students, adult volunteers, young children, and chimpanzees, as well as with large epidemiological, economic, and national datasets.

Email me: adam_bulley@fas.harvard.edu

Johannes Mahr

postdoctoral fellow

Johannes Mahr Curriculum Vitae

Johannes’ research covers episodic memory, imagination, and human communication. His work asks questions like: what is the human mind doing when it claims to remember the past? Why do we remember the past at all? And how do we communicate our memories to others?

More recently, Johannes has become interested in the structure of imagination and its relationship to episodic memory. In this context, he is trying to answer the question of what cognitive mechanisms allow us to ‘mentally travel’ to different possible and actual times.

Email me: jmahr@fas.harvard.edu

Merika Sanders

postdoctoral fellow

Merika Sanders Google Scholar

Merika received her BS from St. Lawrence University, and her MS and PhD from UMass Amherst. Her graduate work tested a theory of how memory is organized in the brain by investigating false memories in older adults and examining visual object processing and recognition memory in healthy subjects using fMRI. Now as a postdoctoral research fellow working with Dr. Daniel Schacter at Harvard University, her research seeks to understand how brain structures well known for their role in memory contribute differentially to imagining the future.

Email me: merikasanders@fas.harvard.edu

Roni Setton

postdoctoral fellow

Roni Setton Google Scholar

Roni grew up in New York and completed her PhD under the supervision of Dr. Nathan Spreng in the Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery at McGill University. Her graduate research investigated brain-behavior associations in healthy aging that may point to adaptive change, especially in the context of autobiographical memory. More broadly, she is interested in how memory interacts with the social world to shape brain function. In her free time, she can be found hiking, baking, or solving crossword puzzles.

Email me: roni.setton@mail.mcgill.ca

Jordana Wynn

postdoctoral fellow

Jordana Wynn Curriculum Vitae

Jordana completed her PhD at the University of Toronto and the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest with Dr. Jennifer Ryan and Dr. Bradley Buchsbaum. Jordana’s research uses converging techniques including eye movement monitoring and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of overt visual attention in memory encoding and retrieval. More broadly, she is interested in exploring how interactions among cognitive and effector systems drive goal directed behavior and how these relationships change with healthy aging. 

Email me: jordanawynn@g.harvard.edu